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Assistant Professor

ART 129
phone: 2508079352

BIOGRAPHY

Academic Training and Interests

Dr. Gainforth’s academic training in Health Promotion, Knowledge Translation and Kinesiology has fostered her belief that evidence-based health promotion interventions and guidelines must be widely disseminated both in general and special  populations.  Her research aims to close the gap between health behaviour change research and practice by examining knowledge translation – the act of moving research evidence into the hands of research users. Her emerging research program aims to identify, develop and implement novel strategies for disseminating evidence-based health information and interventions to populations.  Her systems-based research is grounded in behaviour change theory and techniques and is guided by strong collaborations between researchers and communities.

Dr. Gainforth is accepting graduate and undergraduate students to work or volunteer in her Applied Behaviour Change lab.  Students are asked to forward an application package consisting of a cover letter, up-to-date resume, and transcripts (unofficial are acceptable) to heather.gainforth@ubc.ca.


EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Postdoctoral Fellow, Health Psychology, 2013 – 2015
Centre for Behaviour Change & Dept. of Clinical, Educational & Health Psychology
University College London, London, United Kingdom
Supervisors: Professors Susan Michie & Robert West
Focus: Knowledge Translation in the English Stop Smoking Services

Doctorate of Philosophy, Health Promotion, 2010 – 2013
School of Kinesiology & Health Studies
Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Supervisor: Dr. Amy E. Latimer-Cheung
Focus: Knowledge Mobilization in Community-based Organizations

Master of Science, Health Promotion, 2008 – 2010
School of Kinesiology & Health Studies
Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Supervisor: Dr. Amy E. Latimer-Cheung
Focus: Human Papillomavirus Vaccine (HPV) and Message Framing

Bachelor of Science Kinesiology, Honours, 2004 – 2008
Department of Kinesiology
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Undergraduate Thesis Supervisor: Dr. Steven Bray
Focus: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine and Message Framing


RESEARCH AND TEACHING AREAS

The Applied Behaviour Change (ABC) Lab aims to close the gap between health promotion research and practice by examining knowledge translation – the act of moving research evidence into the hands of research users.  Specifically, Dr. Gainforth’s research program aims to:

  1. Understand the process of knowledge translation
  2. Develop, implement and evaluate knowledge translation and health promotion interventions
  3. Examine social and psychological influences that foster behaviour change

Ongoing projects in the ABC Lab are entitled:

  1. Understanding the development and implementation of knowledge translation interventions in community and health care settings
  2. Investigating the effective application of behaviour change techniques by health behaviour change counsellors using state space grids

Supervision

Dr. Gainforth is accepting graduate and undergraduate students to study, work or volunteer in her Applied Behaviour Change (ABC) lab. Dr. Gainforth is pleased to supervise students with a passion for health promotion, behaviour change and knowledge translation.  Students can expect to expect to receive research training and mentorship from Dr. Gainforth.  To help students bridge the gap between research and practice, all students will be encouraged to complete their research in partnership with community members and organizations.

Prospective students are asked to forward an application package consisting of a cover letter, up-to-date resume, and transcripts (unofficial are acceptable) to heather.gainforth@ubc.ca.


Teaching

Dr. Gainforth teaches HMKN 499 (Projects in Human Kinetics) and HMKN 421 (Advanced Theories of Health Behaviour Change).


SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Books

Michie, S., Campbell, R., West, R., Brown, J., Gainforth, H. L. (2014). ABC of Behaviour Change Theories. Great Britain: Silverback Publishing.

Selected Journal Articles

Gainforth, H. L., Jarvis, J., Berry, T., Chulak-Bozzer, T., Deshpande, S., Faulkner, G., Rhodes, R., Spence, J. C., Tremblay, M., & Latimer-Cheung, A. E. (2015). Evaluating the ParticipACTION Think Again! Campaign. Health Education and Behaviour.

Gainforth, H. L., West, R., Michie, S. (2015). Assessing connections between behavior change theories using network analysis. Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Gainforth, H. L., Latimer-Cheung, A. E., Moore, S., Athanasopoulos, P., & Martin Ginis, K. A. (2014). Using Network Analysis to Understand Knowledge Mobilization in a Community-based Organization. International journal of behavioral medicine, 1-9.

Gainforth, H. L., Latimer-Cheung, A. E., Davis, C., Casemore, S. & Martin Ginis, K. A. (2014). Testing the Feasibility of Training Peers with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) to Learn and Implement Brief Action Planning to Promote Physical Activity to People with SCI. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. DOI: 10.1179/2045772314Y.0000000239.

Gainforth, H. L., Latimer-Cheung, A. E., Athanasopoulos, P., Moore, S., & Martin Ginis, K. (2014).  The Role of Interpersonal Communication in the Process of Knowledge Mobilization within a Community-Based Organization: A Network Analysis. Implementation Science, 9 (1), 59. DOI: 10.1186/1748-5908-9-59.

Gainforth, H. L., Latimer-Cheung, A.E., Athanasopoulos, P., Martin Ginis, K.A. (2014). Examining the Feasibility & Effectiveness of a Community-Based Organization Implementing an Event-Based Knowledge Mobilization Initiative to Promote Physical Activity Guidelines for People with SCI Among Support Personnel. Health Promotion Practice. DOI: 10.1177/1524839914528210.

Gainforth, H. L., O’Malley, D., Mountenay, T., & Latimer-Cheung, A. E. (2013). Independence and Physical Activity Status Moderate Stereotypes toward People with a Physical Disability. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 11(3), 244-257. DOI:1080/1612197X.2013.749001.

Gainforth, H. L., Latimer-Cheung A. E., Athanasopoulos, P., Martin Ginis, K. (2013). Creating an Impact: Examining the Effectiveness of an Event-based Knowledge Mobilization Initiative for Disseminating the Physical Activity Guidelines for People with SCI. Disability & Health, 6(3), 260-265. DOI: 10.1016/j.dhjo.2013.01.012.

Gainforth, H. L., Berry, T., Craig, C., Faulkner, G., Rhodes, R., Spence, J. C., Tremblay, M, & Latimer-Cheung, A. E. (2013).Evaluating the uptake of Canada’s new physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 3(2), 172-179.

Gainforth, H. L., Cao, W., & Latimer-Cheung, A. E. (2012). Message framing and parents’ intentions to have their children vaccinated against HPV. Journal of Public Health Nursing, 6, 542-552. DOI: 1111/j.1525-1446.2012.01038.x.

Gainforth, H. L., Cao, W., & Latimer-Cheung, A. E. (2012). Determinants of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Intent among Three Canadian Target Groups. Journal of Cancer Education, 4, 717-724. DOI: 1007/s13187-012-0389-1.

Gainforth, H. L., & Latimer, A. E. (2011). Risky Business: Risk Information and the Moderating Effect of Message Frame and Past Behavior on Women’s Perceptions of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine. Journal of Health Psychology, 6, 896-905. DOI: 0.1177/1359105311431173

Gainforth, H. L., Barg, C. J., Latimer, A. E., Schmid, K. L., O’Malley, D., & Salovey, P. (2011). An investigation of the theoretical content of physical activity brochures. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 12(6), 615-620. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2011.06.002