Christine Zeindler

Email: christine.zeindler@ubc.ca


 

Dr. Rob Shaw plays singles wheelchair tennis

Dr. Rob Shaw will perform in the 2020 Summer Paralympics.

Just two months ago, Rob Shaw added a new title to his name by completing his Doctor of Philosophy in Interdisciplinary Studies at UBC Okanagan. In just a few weeks, the wheelchair tennis champion will add Paralympic athlete to his name as he competes in the 2020 Summer Paralympics in Tokyo.

Shaw came to UBC Okanagan in 2016 as a doctoral student in Dr. Kathleen Martin Ginis’ spinal cord injury research group. Their work focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of the 85,000 Canadians living with spinal cord injury. Shaw’s work involves investigating the impact of peer mentorship on people with spinal cord injury in hospital and community settings. During the last year, Shaw not only completed his education with the School of Health and Exercise Sciences, but also physically trained full time. Now that his academic life is momentarily on pause, he is focusing on training and competing for Canada in the singles wheelchair tennis event which starts August 27.

He shared a few insights before swinging into action.

What was training like during this pandemic year?

Obviously, COVID-19 made things a little more challenging than usual. Luckily, I’ve been able to train both in Kelowna and Vancouver to maximize my on-court time. However, because we weren’t able to train or compete with others, we haven’t been able to gauge our progression and so it’s hard to determine what level we’re at. We are doing our best with what little information we have.

What have your biggest challenges been during this journey?

I’m used to balancing my studies with training. However, this last year was intense and unusual because but I was working toward two huge milestones — honing my body and mind — at the same time. I worked eight hours a day on my doctoral thesis and then I switched gears to train for the Paralympics. Also, COVID-19 protocols made it difficult for both. My research involves working with people and moving to online platforms required patience. The lack of competitions also made playing tennis a challenge and maintaining peak physical conditioning without going to a gym was tough.

What are you most looking forward to in Tokyo?

I’ve worked hard to reach this goal. Currently, I’m ranked eighth in the world and I am the four-time national quad singles champion. Representing Canada in the Paralympics is an honour and a dream come true. It’s been almost two years since I’ve had a competitive tennis match and so I’m really looking forward to putting my training into match-play. I’m also looking forward to catching up with some of my friends in Tokyo.

What are your thoughts about Canada’s recent Olympic performance?

This was an absolutely tremendous Olympics for Canadian athletes and their support staff. It was amazing to see so many obtain personal bests knowing how difficult their training environments have been in the past two years. I expect to see similar results from Canadian Paralympic athletes as well.

To find out more about Shaw’s research, visit: ok.ubc.ca/okanagan-stories/game-changers

Low-volume, high-interval intensity training requires less than 15 minutes

As pandemic restrictions continue, many are looking for innovative ways to get regular exercise—especially as Zoom meetings seem to creep more into personal time.

UBC Okanagan researcher Jonathan Little, associate professor in the School of Health Exercise Sciences, suggests that low-volume, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be the solution.

His collaborative review, recently published in the Journal of Physiology, explains that this type of exercise can be effective and sometimes even better than traditional forms of aerobic training, such as jogging for 30 minutes or attending a cardio class.

Dr. Little, this year’s UBCO Health Researcher of the Year, describes the difference between low- and high-volume HIIT and offers advice about getting into an exercise groove.

What is low-volume HIIT?

High-intensity interval training involves repeated short bursts of strenuous activity, where people reach 80 to 100 per cent of their predicted maximum heart rate, separated by periods of rest. The difference between high and low-volume HIIT is the time spent being active. For low-volume HIIT this is less than 15 minutes and for high-volume HIIT, it is more than 15 minutes. Low-volume HIIT is becoming increasingly more popular, but it is unclear how well it works, especially for improving cardiovascular and metabolic health. In our recent study, we looked at numerous studies and summarized the findings to date.

What is the current opinion about low-volume HIIT?

Our review of the available studies indicates that low-volume HIIT leads to similar and sometimes greater improvements in metabolic disorders like Type 2 diabetes as well as heart function  — we tend to group these conditions together and call this cardiometabolic health — when compared to moderate aerobic activity. This makes it even more appealing than high-volume HIIT because it takes less effort and time.

When compared to traditional aerobic exercise, what specifically improved in low-volume HIIT participants?

The findings from recent clinical trials indicate that low-volume HIIT can induce improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, glucose control, blood pressure and cardiac function. It also appears that low-volume HIIT is safe and well-tolerated in adults.

How do participants feel about HIIT?

Most of us know that physical activity is considered the cornerstone for the management of cardiometabolic health and regular exercise improves a wide array of conditions from obesity to mental health and mood disorders. However, exercise adoption and adherence continue to be a challenge for many people and they often say that lack of time is a barrier. Low-volume HIIT is certainly time efficient and this may explain why individuals have reported enjoying the exercise, and possibly stick to it longer than traditional aerobic activities.

What is your best advice about exercise?

The first step in any new exercise routine is to get the green light from your physician. Remember that every bout of exercise counts—when you exercise today it improves your metabolic functioning immediately and the benefits last into the next day. Keep in mind there is no magic pill. Exercise impacts almost every organ and organ system in our body in an integrative fashion. There will never be a pill to replace all the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Finally, the optimal strategy for you is one that you enjoy and can stick to.

What is the next step for your research?

I am part of a cross-disciplinary team at UBC who, along with colleagues at Liverpool John Moores University, is conducting a study to identify effective methods to help people with Type 2 diabetes increase and maintain exercise and physical activity levels long term. Called Motivate T2D, this six-month home-based exercise study will pair participants with an exercise specialist, who will guide them through a personalized exercise prescription using virtual counselling. It’s a completely remote clinical trial so is available to anybody from across Canada who has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the last 24 months. For more information, you can visit motivatet2d.com.

To find out more about Dr. Little’s research, visit: ourstories.ok.ubc.ca/stories/jonathan-little

UBC Okanagan’s 2021 Health Researcher of the Year Jonathan Little.

UBC Okanagan’s 2021 Health Researcher of the Year Jonathan Little.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

UBCO researchers weigh in on heart mechanics, mating behaviour and the best romance novels

UBC Okanagan faculty put their hearts into research and teaching. To mark Valentine’s Day, they are highlighting their expertise on matters of the heart—from what makes it tick to how to keep the emotions pumping.

Advances in biomedical engineering and understanding of cardiovascular disease

Researchers from the School of Engineering and the Faculty of Health and Social Development are working on the development of mechanical heart valves and believe they are on the cusp of improving heart function.

A team of researchers at UBCO’s Heart Valve Performance Lab has developed a way to improve mechanical heart valves so they will match the real thing closely.

“Our goal is to create mechanical heart valves that perform consistently and seamlessly inside the human body,” explains Dr. Hadi Mohammadi, an associate professor at the School of Engineering. “The way blood travels through the body is unique to a person’s physiology, so a ‘one-size-fits-all’ valve has been a real challenge.”

Mohammadi adds that such advances in biomedical engineering can lead to innovative solutions for complex health issues such as heart disease.

**

An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has likely adapted to support endurance physical activities. For this, Dr. Rob Shave has taken an evolutionary step backwards by comparing the human heart’s structure and function with our closest ancestors, the great apes.

“We hope our research will inform those at highest risk of developing hypertensive heart disease,” says Shave, director of UBCO’s School of Health and Exercise Sciences. “And ensure that moderate-intensity endurance-type activities are widely encouraged in order to ultimately prevent premature deaths.”

According to Shave, cardiovascular disease is an ongoing global concern and that his research will further the understanding of how to improve the quality of lives of those affected.

Spiders need hearts too

It may be at odds with their creepy reputation, but spiders also have hearts.

“Spider hearts are actually in their abdomens,” says Dr. Matt Nelson, a lecturer in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science and resident spider expert. “Unlike our hearts, spider hearts are just tubes with arteries on either end and valves to prevent backflow. Hemolymph, their blood equivalent, is pumped out into the body cavity when the heart contracts; when [the heart] relaxes, hemolymph flows back into the heart through tiny holes called ostia. Often spiders have a mark on top of their abdomen called a heart mark.  The heart is right under that mark.”

Nelson adds that it’s important to understand the differences between species in order to better understand the role they all play in maintaining ecosystems.

Researchers explore how romance in the wild impacts wildlife populations

Animal courtship rituals, where an animal 'struts' its stuff for a partner, vary widely. As part of their research, graduate students of Dr. Adam Ford, assistant professor in the Faculty of Science, has observed some of these different mating strategies.

“Male cougars will spend three to 10 days with their prospective mate playing, as well as sharing meals and time together,” says Siobhan Darlington, an ecology doctoral student co-supervised by Ford and Dr. Karen Hodges. She explains that cougars can mate year-round, unlike many wild animals.

Fellow doctoral student and deer specialist Chloe Wright agrees. “Mule deer usually mate only in the fall and the pregnant doe will spend the winter months gestating, or supporting the growth of her fetuses. During the breeding season, male deer use their antlers to establish a hierarchy by fighting other male deer. The winner usually gets his pick of the females.”

Both researchers add that these rituals are all important in understanding how wildlife populations are maintained, how predator-prey interactions unfold and, most importantly, how sustainable wildlife protection practices can help ensure that our environments stay healthy and resilient.

What is the best romance read?

“Literature and the arts help us better appreciate the human experience,” says Dr. Marie Loughlin, associate professor of English in the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies.

“Valentine’s Day is a great excuse to delve into one of the most important human emotions and reread foundational examples of literature, like Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice.”

She adds that her heart lies with books about the love of literature such as 84, Charing Cross Road, by Helene Hanff, which recounts a lifelong love affair with books. She also recommends A History of Reading by Alberto Manguel. “This captures the long history of our love of books and reading from antiquity to the present,” she suggests.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

UBCO experts share sweet advice about sugar and artificial sweeteners

Researchers offer top tips for a healthy Halloween

Like so many other areas of life, Halloween festivities may look a little different this year in the midst of COVID-19. As health authorities ask people to take precautions and parents grapple with what is safe for their children, one thing remains constant: Kids love candy.

To help provide some relief, experts at UBC Okanagan are weighing in on what the best treats are and how to avoid being tricked by clever marketing.

Although sugar doesn’t cause diabetes, eat mindfully says Jonathan Little, associate professor in the Faculty of Health and Social Development's School of Health and Exercise Sciences

"One of the biggest nutrition myths is that sugar causes diabetes. Sugar intake alone won’t do this; the major risk factors for Type 2 diabetes are age, genetics and obesity. You obviously can’t do much about the first two but your lifestyle can influence your weight status. Excess calories from any source, combined with physical inactivity, can promote weight gain, which in turn, increases the risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.

Also, it is important to monitor sugar and carbohydrate intake for those who have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. It should be routine to avoid foods with added sugars and refined carbohydrates. During holidays and festivities rather than reaching for sugary treats, look for those with higher protein and flavour, such as nuts, homemade granola or trail mix, or cheese. Not only will this most likely be healthier, they will also provide more sustained energy."

Sugar has many disguises, says Wesley Zandberg, assistant professor of chemistry in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science

"Sugar is a whole group of sweet-tasting carbohydrates that may often go by other names such as glucose, fructose, lactose, dextrose—anything with the ‘-ose’ ending. Although chemically different, the body sees them as the same, whether from a candy bar or in concentrated fruit juices. And all are very, very high sources of calories.

In the case of whole fruit, though, sugars are also found linked together to form dietary fibres which the body cannot digest and instead powers the good bacteria living in the human gut. So, stick with the whole fruit, not the concentrated juice!

And keep your eye on labels. Smuggled-in sugars could be listed as carbohydrates, fruit juice concentrate, corn, malt or maple syrup. When searching for sugar-free treats, don’t let the labels fool you and learn the sugar synonyms.”

Artificial sweeteners may be harmful to your good gut bacteria, says Deanna Gibson, an associate professor of biology in the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Science

"Artificial sweeteners are calorie-free synthetic sugar substitutes added to food and drinks to make them taste sweet. Although this seems like a good idea, there has been controversy around how healthy and safe these additives actually are. One of their side-effects is that they are toxic to the healthy bacteria in our guts, which are necessary for many bodily functions, including digestion and immunity. In fact, the consumption of these sweeteners has been associated with altering the gut bacteria, throwing off the immune and metabolic balance.

Recently, a study by Raylene Reimer at the University of Calgary has shown that maternal consumption of low-calorie sweeteners including aspartame and stevia during pregnancy pre-programs their offspring to gain weight. This study highlights that artificial sweeteners promote obesity-causing gut microbes that are passed from the mother to their babies.

While eating large amounts of sugar is not good for those with diabetes, eating artificial sugar substitutes are not a healthy alternative. My recommendation is to eat little processed food and enjoy small amounts of natural sugars on Halloween!"

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning founded in 2005 in partnership with local Indigenous peoples, the Syilx Okanagan Nation, in whose territory the campus resides. As part of UBC—ranked among the world’s top 20 public universities—the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world in British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

Almost 10 years ago, Bell launched “Let’s Talk”, an initiative to promote awareness and positive change in the mental health of Canadians.

UBC Okanagan experts are available to comment on several areas of mental health research. Bell Let’s Talk Day takes place Wednesday, January 29.

Happiness and canine therapy

John-Tyler Binfet

Associate professor, Okanagan School of Education

  • How students are kind; kindness in school; dog therapy; stress reduction in college students.

General psychology

Shirley Hutchinson

Lecturer, psychology department, Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences

  • General psychology; child development; adult development and aging; special topics: psychology of motivation; anxiety, fear, and uncertainty in intergroup relations.

Health psychology

Shelly Ben-David

Assistant professor, School of Social Work

  • Youth mental health including clinical high-risk to psychosis, first-episode psychosis, anxiety and depression; early intervention in mental health; identity in the early stages of psychosis; digital divide among youth; mental health service use decision making; mental health service use engagement interventions; implementation research; youth engagement in research.

Karen Ragoonaden

Professor, Okanagan School of Education

  • Mindfulness and well-being, Stress Management and Resiliency Techniques (SMART) education.

Sally Willis Stewart

Senior instructor, School of Health and Exercise Sciences
Director, Nutrition Education Centre

  • Nutrition and physical activity; obesity and eating disorder prevention; student well-being, mental well-being and resiliency, HEAL100 instructor.

Indigenous health, effects of climate change

Nelly Oelke

Associate professor, School of Nursing

  • Mental health and wellness in rural communities with adults aged 50 and over; impacts of climate change and climate change events on mental health and well-being; mental wellness in urban Indigenous adults aged 50 and over.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

Currently there are more than 1,600 active research projects underway at UBCO.

UBCO stories you may have missed in 2019

UBCO Okanagan has grown to a student population of more than 10,000. With this growth, has come new research opportunities—currently there are more than 1,600 active projects. UBCO researchers are challenging established assumptions, innovating solutions and creating new knowledge that will have broad impacts on our society. Here are some of the accomplishments reached in 2019.

Promoting resilient environments

UBCO biologists have discovered a new source of carbon dioxide in lake water that is used for irrigation. Their findings have practical applications for agriculture-based communities in arid regions. For more

Ecologists from UBCO and the University of Alberta have developed non-invasive methods for tracking animals, using DNA found in their feces, saliva and hair. These approaches will provide improved understanding of wildlife migration and population trends. For more

Supporting healthy people

UBCO has joined with international partners to determine how the human heart has adapted to engage in endurance physical activities. The findings will bring new insights to the international effort to reduce hypertensive heart disease—one of the most common causes of illness and death in the developed world. For more

UBCO researchers partnered with an international research team to complete 15 major scientific studies in Peru’s Cerro de Pasco to better understand how high altitude affects newcomers and Indigenous populations. This research is relevant for people who suffer from low oxygen health conditions including those with lung or heart disease. For more

A new Faculty of Medicine Research Centre, the first such facility outside the Lower Mainland, was established at UBC Okanagan. The Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Management will serve as a provincial leader for research, knowledge translation and exchange in the urgent research field of chronic diseases. For more

Developing emerging technologies

UBC Okanagan researchers have discovered a new class of anti-ice surface coatings. These low interfacial toughness (LIT) materials ease the force required to remove ice from large areas, such as car windshields. For more

Researchers at UBC Okanagan’s School of Engineering have developed a low-cost sensor that can be interlaced into textiles and composite materials. While the research is still ongoing, it may pave the way for smart clothing that can monitor human movement. For more

Building thriving communities

UBCO researchers were involved in an international study which found that people are more charitable if allowed to quickly claim tax credits for their donations. Their findings showed that changing the deadline for donations so they land close to tax time increased contributions by nine per cent. For more

Thanks to a visiting international fellowship, a UBCO professor is collaborating with the University of Exeter to promote and disseminate environmental humanities research. This field speaks to the interconnectedness of climate change, factory farming and human health. For more

Choosing your holiday drinks wisely

UBCO professor shares tips for sipping sensibly during a healthy holiday

For those concerned about sugar intake, particularly people on a diet or with diabetes, ringing in the holidays with the clinking of glasses may be a significant challenge. But for UBC Okanagan diet and exercise scientist Mary Jung, a few simple strategies can help maintain a healthy dose of holiday cheer while keeping sugar consumption to a minimum.

“We don’t often think about the amount of sugar in our drinks,” says Jung, an associate professor in UBC Okanagan’s School of Health and Exercise Sciences. “The truth is our beverages, whether they’re cocktail, mocktail or bubbly, contain a large amount of sugar. Combined with the alcohol, this could lead to a nasty morning-after for some and a crisis for those with health issues, such as diabetes.”

Jung, who researches how to self-regulate exercise, diet and physical behaviour, adds that not all is humbug. She suggests a few sipping guidelines for a merry and bright holiday morning.

Red versus white or bubbly

“The dryer the wine—which is a term for those that don’t taste sweet—the lower the sugar content,” says Jung. “This is true also for champagnes or sparkling wines.”

She adds that red wine may generally have less sugar than white and that fortified or ice wine will have the highest.

Watch the pours, adds Jung. “Wine glasses are purposefully large to encourage swirling, not necessarily to fill to the brim. The caloric estimates of one glass of wine are based on 5-ounce glass.”

Cocktails

“Hard liquor such as rum, tequila, gin and vodka have low or little sugar,” says Jung. “However, once you mix them with juice, soda and tonic water, this will increase.”

Jung suggests challenging taste buds with sugar-free soda, sugar-free cranberry juice or carbonated water with a squeeze of fresh lemon or lime.

Beer and coolers

“Unlike dry wine and spirits, beer contains calories from both the alcohol and the carbohydrates,” says Jung. “Consider instead a low-carb or light beer.”

She adds that coolers are not that cool when it comes to sugar content.

“Many coolers—beverages made mainly with vodka or rum—deliver at least 250 calories per 355 ml serving. This is more than you would consume in two bottles of light beer.”

She adds that some of these have as much as 310 calories and eight teaspoons of sugar per drink.

Mocktails or punches

“Non-alcoholic drinks like mocktails and punches are a fun alternative,” she says. “However, they may be high in sugar with the addition of juice and soda.”

To lighten these, she suggests being creative with fresh herbs like mint or basil and using carbonated water instead of soda.

How much sugar?

“As a general rule, the daily recommended sugar intake should not be more than 25 grams for women and 36 grams for men,” says Jung. “This adds up quickly. Be informed about your decisions and read the labels.”

“Every 5-ounce glass of wine, 1.5 ounces of hard liquor or a 12-ounce bottle of light beer has roughly 100 calories. Regular beer delivers 150 calories per 12-ounce serving,” she says.

Jung recommends keeping track of consumption.

“Monitor, monitor and monitor!” she says. “This is especially important when pouring wine or liquor. Track by the ounce, not by the glass!”

She suggests alternating alcoholic drinks with water or a non-sugar beverage.

Planning ahead

“Even more critical than drink choices or modifications are self-regulatory strategies,” says Jung. “It can be helpful to think about your personal health goals and how much you value them.”

She recommends deciding in advance what success looks like. For example, how many drinks will you have? Also, determine how much sugar will come from the accompanying food versus that from the beverages.

If you’re stumped, Jung suggests reading the guide from Diabetes Canada.

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca

Rob Shaw, doctoral student in UBC Okanagan’s Faculty of Health and Social Development.

Rob Shaw, doctoral student in UBC Okanagan’s Faculty of Health and Social Development.

Rob Shaw earns Canada’s first podium finish in Parapan American singles wheelchair tennis

UBC's Rob Shaw served up victory for Canada at the recent Parapan American Games in Lima, Peru.

Shaw is the first-ever Parapan American Quad-tennis champion and the first Canadian tennis player to a win a singles medal at a multi-sport games.

“This is definitely the biggest win so far of my career if you consider the magnitude of the stage and the number of fans in the crowd," says Shaw a doctoral student in UBC Okanagan’s Faculty of Health and Social Development.

He adds that he’s had bigger emotional wins, but as far as a complete package, winning a gold medal is as big as it gets.

Rob Shaw is the first-ever Parapan American Quad-tennis champion and the first Canadian tennis player to a win a singles medal at a multi-sport games.

Rob Shaw is the first-ever Parapan American Quad-tennis champion and the first Canadian tennis player to a win a singles medal at a multi-sport games.

Shaw came to UBC Okanagan in 2016 as a doctoral student in professor Kathleen Martin Ginis’ spinal cord injury research group. Their work focuses on improving the health and well-being of the 85,000 Canadians living with spinal cord injury. In particular, Shaw is investigating the impact of peer mentorship for people with spinal cord injury in both hospital and community settings.

“I have experienced firsthand the benefits of peer mentorship as both a mentee and mentor,” he says. “This personal knowledge drives my passion for investigating how to maximize the effectiveness of this service.”

Martin Ginis, a professor with the Faculty of Medicine and the School of Health and Exercise Sciences, says Shaw is an outstanding student-athlete and a recognized leader within the spinal cord injury community and beyond.

“I am absolutely thrilled for Rob,” she says. “He is truly a difference-maker—on the court, in our lab, and in the community. We are cheering him all the way.”

Shaw is the highest-ranked member of the Canadian wheelchair tennis team, ranking ninth in the world and is the reigning four-time national quad singles champion. In addition to completing his doctoral degree, Shaw has his sights set on qualifying for the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics.

“I’m just really happy to be part of the massive tennis movement in Canada,” says Shaw. “There’s a really big tennis wave going through the country right now and it’s just nice to contribute a little ripple.”

About UBC's Okanagan campus

UBC’s Okanagan campus is an innovative hub for research and learning in the heart of British Columbia’s stunning Okanagan Valley. Ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world, UBC is home to bold thinking and discoveries that make a difference. Established in 2005, the Okanagan campus combines a globally recognized UBC education with a tight-knit and entrepreneurial community that welcomes students and faculty from around the world.

To find out more, visit: ok.ubc.ca